Frequently Asked Questions

Do you have a question?

Do you have a Far Infrared Heater question?

Here you will find the answers to the most commonly asked questions about Infranomic and the Infranomic heating method using infrared warmth.

If you have a question that is not listed please feel free to contact us.

Remember, no question is a silly question if you don't know the answer!

  1. What Is Infrared energy?
  2. How does the far infrared heating unit work?
  3. What is convection?
  4. How much radiant heat do far infrared heating units produce?
  5. How efficient are the heaters?
  6. How many cubic meters of living space can an Infranomic heating unit heat?
  7. Are They Difficult to Install?
  8. Can the Infranomic heating units be installed next to a shower or bath?
  9. What needs to be considered when operating an Infranomic heating unit?
  10. Are Maintenance Costs High?
  11. What seal of approval have Infranomic heating units been awarded?
  12. Do Infranomic heating units generate electromagnetic pollution?
  13. Can I cover the heating units?
  14. Does the surface of your heaters get hot?
  15. Is there a danger of electric shock if one of the panes is broken?
  16. Do you class far infrared heaters as a Primary or Secondary heat source?
  17. Is Infrared Healthy?
  18. How Long Has This Technology Been Around?
  19. Are They Bulky and Intrusive?

1. What Is Infrared Energy?

Infrared rays are heat rays emitted by the sun or in our case by our heating panels. These heat rays come in a wide spectrum from visible heat which glows red to the invisible heat rays at the far end of this spectrum which are the rays that we use. This form of radiant heat is unique in that it heats people and objects directly without heating the air. It is completely safe in contrast to UV, X rays or radioactive rays, and its rays are absorbed by objects in the same way that we absorb the sun's rays. This absorbed heat is then released into the air and an example is when at night you can use infrared cameras to detect heat given off from people or buildings.

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2. How does the Far Infrared heating unit work?

The warmth is generated from electrically conducting carbon fibres that are fixed behind a glass or ceramic plate. When electricity is passed through these fibres, they begin to warm up and transmit the comforting infrared light.

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3. What is convection?

Convection is the warming of the surrounding air, as is the case with a conventional heater. The heated surrounding air rises due to its low density and forces the colder air to the ground. The air begins to circulate; dust is disturbed and dispersed into the surrounding air. Convection heating can lead to a “cold feet effect”, as the colder air is permanently forced to the ground. With our Far Infrared heating units however, there is a relatively low convection effect and therefore only a small amount of dust is disturbed and warmth is distributed evenly.

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4. How much radiant heat do Far Infrared heating units produce?

The heating unit produces around 70% radiant heat and only 30% convection. Normal radiators produce the contrary. The degree of efficiency of a panel is close to 100% - so almost all of the electricity used by the heaters is transformed into heat.

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5. How efficient are the heaters?

Conventional convection heating e.g. radiators, work by slowly warming up themselves then heating the air and this in turn heats people and walls etc. Each time a transfer of heat occurs it wastes energy so conventional heating is not very energy efficient at all.

By contrast Far Infrared panels reach optimum temperature almost immediately and heat people and objects directly with no air resistance and therefore no energy wastage at all. This generally leads to our panels only running for 30% of the time.

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6. How many cubic meters of living space can an Infranomic heating unit heat?

Not just the surface area but also on the height of the room, the arrangement of heaters; the existing insulation and the outside temperature can determine which and how many heating units you require. The following rules of thumb can act as a rough guide for a building with modern heat insulation:

Approx. Room Volume
Heat Power
Dimensions of the Heating Unit
1-9 m3
200 W
600 x 400 mm
9.1-18.1 m3
400 W
700 x 600 mm
18.2-22.7 m3
500 W
900 x 600 mm
22.8-27.2 m3
600 W
1100 x 600 mm
27.3-31.8 m3
700 W
1200 x 600 mm

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7. Are They Difficult to Install?

No. You simply hang them on a ceiling or wall in the same way you would hang a picture or mirror. They can be plugged into a socket point or wired directly like a light fitting. There are no messy pipes or boilers required and being off the floor they take up no living space.

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8. Can the Infranomic heating units be installed next to a shower or bath?

The heating units have been splash-proof tested and approved by TÜV Süd (IPX 4). Installation in the bathroom is therefore completely possible. However, the electric wiring to the heater must conform to the regulations of the country where they are installed.

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9. What needs to be considered when operating an Infranomic heating unit?

Operation is very easy – the unit works automatically when plugged into the mains. The efficiency however, is greatly increased if a timer/thermostat is included in the circuitry.

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10. Are Maintenance Costs High?

There are no maintenance costs as the panels contain no moving parts and do not rely on water as a heating medium. As such there are no radiators to bleed, boilers to service or system to be flush cleaned. As a matter of fact the only maintenance tool is a feather duster.

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11. What seal of approval have Infranomic heating units been awarded?

The heating units have been awarded the TÜV/GS safety approval from the German TÜV Sud Technical Inspection Authority. A CE mark confirms the product’s adhesion to current European guidelines.

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12. Do Infranomic heating units generate electromagnetic pollution?

The magnetic field produced by Infranomic heating units is smaller than the field strength of a normal electric light bulb.

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13. Can I cover the heating units?

No. Heat would build up under the covered area and this would cause the temperature to rise. The integrated temperature safety cutout reacts at a temperature of around 105° C. However, Infranomic heating units should not be covered under any circumstances!

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14. Does the surface of your heaters get hot?

In a word ‘Yes’, they are a heater! The surface temperature is roughly the same as a conventional radiator, approximately 90° C, if touched you would move your hand away and with such short contact there is absolutely no risk of burning or blistering.

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15. Is there a danger of electric shock if one of the panes is broken?

No! Even if the glass is broken, the pieces will be held in place because the double insulated carbon fibres are fixed to the entire surface with an adhesive. However, for safety reasons, the power plug should be pulled out immediately if the glass is broken.

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16. Do you class Far Infrared heaters as a Primary or Secondary heat source?

We most definitely class our heating elements as a Primary heat source; the power output is perfectly adequate to heat a room to a very warm and comfortable level. However, if you wish to have a heating element purely to boost a rooms temperature then they are equally efficient; we have a wide range of Portable Free Standing elements designed for such a purpose.

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17. Is Infrared Healthy?

Yes. In fact until recent times the far infrared rays that we use have been mostly used in heat sources for premature babies in incubators and in special infrared saunas to relieve arthritis and speed recovery from muscle injuries. This is because our bodies warm up by absorbing these beneficial rays and as a result blood flow and circulation is boosted.

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18. How Long Has This Technology Been Around?

It was actually invented in 1967 by a Japanese Doctor. It has been used to heat residences and offices etc for over 14 years in Europe and North America. The ancient Greeks and Romans also used a similar heating principle by using bellows and fire to heat the walls of their buildings directly and then allowed this heat to radiate outwards and heat the air. Similarly today's wood burning stoves or Aga ranges provide heat by radiation not convection, to also heat objects directly before heating the air.

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19. Are They Bulky and Intrusive?

They are about 1.5 inches deep and are usually rectangular or square. They come in a standard black or white finish to blend with furnishings but can be customised to have a mirror finish or even to look like a painting! The finish look is virtually unlimited.

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